cronechronicler

You don't know where you are going. You don't know how to get there. And you arrive just the same. Ghanaian saying

Happy Birthday in Hard Times

Raise your sails high
But don’t pull up anchor
Keep dreaming and planning
This can’t last forever

Keep flow in your life
Laugh, enjoy your friends
Family spirit enfolds you
With love and uplifting

Amazing new things
Bloom in our culture
Hard times’ bestow change
Endurance conquers

Rejoice in small moments
Taste your good cooking
Connections are precious
Zoom where you will

I love you, Bobby
You’re so dear to me
Stay safe and healthy
Until good times roll

For my grandson on his twenty-first birthday

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It Started With an Amaryllis

First there was the bowl of amaryllis bulbs my son and his wife gave me for Christmas. There were five bulbs the size of softballs. Each bulb had two shoots that promised glorious blooms. Today ten scarlet amaryllis flowers form a small shrub offset brilliantly by the clean white snow outside my window. I wanted to take a picture of the amaryllis to show my son and daughter-in-law who live in Minneapolis. But I don’t know how to do this with my smart phone. I would have to wait until one of my Cleveland grandchildren showed up to do this for me.

Yesterday my project was to print the Haiku I wrote two days ago on greeting cards using a Microsoft Word format so I could send each grandchild a Valentine. I discovered that Word greeting cards aren’t very flexible and don’t allow for the Haiku structure. I finally gave up and sent my grandchildren texts. As I texted each Haiku my phone remembered the words for me and had memorized my Haiku by the time I sent the last one. Then there was the fun of receiving texts back from each grandchild.

With the success of my Haiku greetings I decided to see if I could take photos of my amaryllis. And I somehow did.

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Haiku: Bobby’s Journeying

Your sails set just so
Edging out of the harbor
Adventures await

Your talents galore
Steer the way toward your future
What work will you choose?

Now time to linger
With family and roommates
Cook up a fine meal.

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Haiku: James – A Revelation

At age five or six
Curiosity took hold
Drove you to explore

Everything fair game
You created ways to play
Drove me to despair

AHA moment struck
Finally I saw revealed
Genius in you

Mysteries to me
Your knowledge of how things work
Produced summer job

James, I’m proud of you
College years begin next fall
New things to explore

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Haiku: James, On Your Eighteenth Birthday

Gears in your mind turn
Creative thinking evolves
Your own signature

Your zest steers a path
You envision future days
My heart swells with pride

I treasure today
Creating Eggs Benedict
Simply sharing love

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Haiku: Caps In the Air

Summer job, pay checks
Oldest grandson makes me proud
Hard work paying off

Real life lessons learned
High School Senior must apply
Goal to graduate

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Haiku: Music In the Air

White boots, drums, trombones
Figures traced on football field
Practice for the fall

Grandson joined the band
Plays new sounds that stir old hearts
Some things never change

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Haiku: Litmus test

How to be Grandma?
Though endowed with snow-white hair
Baking’s not my lot.

Grandkid’s faces beam
Some in scrapbooks, some on wall
Own no camera.

Once sent greeting cards
For significant events.
Birthday cards endure.

Just don’t measure up
Must not be in DNA
Then it came to me.

Always been like this.
My grandchildren know me well.
Who else could I be?

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On the Occasion of James’ Fourteenth Birthday

Here’s to my dear grandson James
Who likes to cook over the flames
For his birthday the trick
Is to fix eggs Benedict
Then we will play some card games.

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Negotiating Lunch

When my son and his family dropped me off after our extended family Easter brunch my grandson James asked if he could come to lunch the next day. I quickly rummaged through my refrigerator mentally and said yes. I volunteered that I had deli ham and cheese and “healthy” bread (meaning not likely to be something a thirteen year old would like). James replied that he could bring macaroni and cheese, at which his almost sixteen year old brother groaned as a put-down to his younger brother who considers himself quite the chef. My daughter-in-law, who well knows that I am mostly retired from cooking, offered to send along some left-overs she had on hand. Menu settled we set a time for James to be dropped off at my apartment the next day. Game on.

James arrived with a goodie bag. We explored what his mother had packed and found the remains of a Key lime pie (his mother remembered that is one of my favorites), chunks of cantaloupe and a big bag of potato chips. On my part I had come up with some little pecan tartlets purchased at the grocery store bakery left over from a pot luck with friends. Also I discovered I had bagel thins on hand we could use instead of healthy bread. I laid out the sandwich fixings and we were ready to roll. James suggested we grill our sandwiches in the toaster oven. I replied that in my experience bagel thins tend to get too dry in the toaster oven. Then James, always looking for new ways to do things, said lets add fried eggs to our sandwiches. Yes! He got out a skillet while I got stuff from the refrigerator. James chose three eggs, expertly cracked one for me and fried it over-easy to perfection. He did the same with the other two for himself. I started setting the kitchen table but James wanted to eat on the dining room table. He wanted candle light and music, too. A young man after my heart since that is how I eat my dinner. He put the icing on the cake when he said he preferred old-time music. We agreed on Chet Baker and his jazz horn to accompany our meal. There we sat, two friends two generations apart mutually sharing a convivial lunch.

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